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Lentils lend a fresh take on tabbouleh

Lentil tabbouleh. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Lentil tabbouleh. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

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LENTIL TABBOULEH

Start to finish: 30 minutes

Servings: 12

2 cups dry green or French lentils

Salt

1 cup chopped fresh parsley

2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme

2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano

4 cloves garlic, minced

3 stalks celery, diced

1/2 cup sliced Kalamata olives

1 red bell pepper, cored and diced

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

3 tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Ground black pepper

1/2 cup slivered almonds, toasted

Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Add the lentils and cook until al dente, about 15 minutes.

Use a mesh strainer to drain the lentils, then spread them in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Transfer to the refrigerator to cool.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the parsley, thyme, oregano, garlic, celery, olives and red pepper.

In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, lemon juice and olive oil. Drizzle the dressing over the herbs and vegetables, then mix thoroughly. Once the lentils have cooled (they don’t need to be chilled, just no longer hot), add to the bowl and mix well. Season with salt and pepper, then sprinkle the almonds over the top.

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Updated: September 23, 2013 2:23PM



My mother loves tabbouleh. And given how healthy it is, it’s not such a bad food to love.

I found that if I tweaked the recipe a bit, I liked it a lot more. The classic combination of lemon, parsley and garlic on cracked wheat is good, but it can be so much more.

I like to swap out the traditional cracked bulgur wheat base for a different whole grain, such as farro, spelt, kamut, barley or even brown rice.

For this recipe, I used green lentils, which are packed with nutrients, low in fat, and high in fiber.

Next up, the herbs. Traditionally, tabbouleh is made with lots of parsley and some mint.

It’s pretty easy to switch those up for just about any fresh, leafy herb. Try cilantro or even basil.



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