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Frankfort Girl Scout troop helps children with cancer

Frankfort Girl Scout Troop 385 members organized more than 200 toys collected for Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation.  |

Frankfort Girl Scout Troop 385 members organized more than 200 toys collected for the Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation. | Supplied photo

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Updated: July 17, 2013 6:02AM



The Girl Scouts organization requires the leadership and planning skills necessary to make a positive impact in the community.

That is exactly what the members of Girl Scout Troop 385, of Frankfort, did recently when they collected more than 200 toys and volunteered to label and categorize the toys to benefit the Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation, which is based in Orland Park.

The toys will comfort children fighting cancer across the United States. Recipients will include those receiving treatment at Hope Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn.

The Girl Scout mission is simple: to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.

“Our goal is to help other people,” Girl Scout troop leader Cathy White said. “Many of us have had our lives touched by cancer.”

Girl Scout Ashley White added, “Kids who have cancer should get toys because they need to think about other things.”

“The Treasure Chest Foundation is especially grateful to Girl Scout Troop 385 for their gift of service,” said Colleen Kisel, chief executive officer and founder of the Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation.

“Not only do we appreciate the girls’ hard work, but we are so happy to be a part of this wonderful organization, which is dedicated to making the world a better place.

“The Treasure Chest Foundation is a better place because of Girl Scout Troop 385.”

The Pediatric Oncology Treasure Chest Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides comfort and distraction from painful procedures to children and teens diagnosed with cancer by providing a toy, gift or gift certificate in 42 hospitals nationwide.

Official said there is nowhere else in the nation that such a program exists.

Kisel founded the organization in 1996 after her then 7-year-old son Martin had been diagnosed with leukemia in 1993.

She discovered that giving her son a toy after each procedure provided a calming distraction from his pain, noting that when children are diagnosed with cancer their world soon becomes filled with doctors, nurses, chemotherapy drugs, surgeries and seemingly endless painful procedures.

Martin celebrated his 19th anniversary of remission from the disease earlier in 2013.

Information about the Treasure Chest Foundation: Colleen Kisel at (708) 687-8697 or treasurechest.org.

Staff reports



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