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Dekker: Tinley Park’s Easter Bunny Hop is next Sunday

Historical Society volunteers (from left) Mary Ann Marino Connie Pavur Ray GustafsEd PSiemsen show off some vintage hats display. |

Historical Society volunteers (from left) Mary Ann Marino, Connie Pavur and Ray Gustafson and Ed and Pat Siemsen show off some of the vintage hats on display. | Supplied photo

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Updated: April 18, 2013 6:09AM



A happy St. Patrick’s Day to all of you! Most of us in Tinley Park started our celebrating last Sunday with the village’s larger-than-life Downtown Tinley Irish Parade.

Once again, thousands showed up to celebrate all things Irish. Personally, I could handle another corned beef sandwich just fine, so let the celebration continue.

While we’re still in the celebrating mood, I’d like to hop to another holiday event coming up (sorry I can’t resist a bad pun!).

The next free family event in downtown Tinley Park is the Easter Bunny Hop from noon to 3 p.m. March 24. If you have kids, you don’t want to miss an afternoon of fun activities.

You also can visit with the Easter bunny in the gazebo at the Vogt Visual Arts Center, 17420 S. 67th Court. Be sure to bring your cameras.

The Vogt gallery will also be open so you can check out the photography exhibit now on display. 67th Court will be closed off for music, dancing and games, and kids can learn how to do the “bunny hop.”

There will be an Easter egg hunt in the lot to the north of the Vogt Center. The times are 12:30 p.m. for ages 3 and under and ages 4 and 5 and 1 p.m. for ages 6 to 9. American Legion Post 615 will also offer various games along with cookie decorating and food available for purchase.

You’ll also want to visit the Tinley Park Historical Society to see its vintage dress and bonnet display. You’ll see beautiful dresses and wedding clothes and hats from the early 1900s, many of which belonged to early Tinley Park residents and were donated by their relatives.

The historical society will also have Easter crafts for children to make. And outside the society, you can visit with PAWS of Tinley Park and meet some dogs and cats that are up for adoption.

Adding to the atmosphere, students from Tinley Park High School’s drama department will be strolling through the Easter Bunny Hop, dressed in early 1900s vintage costumes. In fact, everyone who shows up wearing an Easter bonnet or hat will receive a free gift (boys too!)

Long ago, it was tradition for children to wear festively decorated Easter bonnets and hats to church services and Easter gatherings, using them later to hold the eggs and treats collected in the Easter egg hunt.

The tradition of wearing new clothes at Easter developed from a desire to celebrate the renewal and promise of a new year.

Ladies purchased new and elaborate Easter hats, taking the opportunity at the end of Lent to buy luxury items.

At the depths of the Great Depression, a new hat or a refurbished old one at Easter was a simple luxury.

During the Victorian era, daily dress was much more formal than today. Unless you were a laborer, every gentleman was expected to wear a coat, vest and hat. Ladies wore long dresses and elaborate hats, lavishly decorated with lace, feathers, ribbons and flowers.

Today in our casual society, fewer people take part in the Easter tradition of wearing hats, but maybe on March 24 we’ll bring a little bit of that tradition back.

Remember the Easter bunny Hop is a free event, so put on your hats and come enjoy the day.

The easiest way to keep on top of all the events happening in downtown Tinley Park, as well as specials and promotions offered by Oak Park Avenue businesses, is to sign up for the Downtown Tinley email newsletter.

Visit www.downtowntinley.com to sign up for the newsletter and make sure that you don’t miss out on any of the fun.



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