HaitiTwoYearsLater

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Following the trail of help to Haiti

We went to Haiti to see for ourselves. On Jan. 12, 2010, a massive earthquake leveled much of Port-au-Prince. For the capital city, already battling economic and social challenges, the result was utter devastation. The earthquake’s massive destruction gave way to deplorable living conditions, a …

‘It’s a work of mercy to bury the dead’

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It’s barely daybreak in Haiti, and already dozens of mothers and their kids are lined outside the gates to St. Damien Pediatric Hospital, sweating for a chance to see a doctor.

Volunteer doctors, who’ve come from around the world, are awake and prepping for a …

Suburban teen on mission to become a doctor

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When the doctors who rescued a dying woman from the side of the road near Titanyen burial ground brought her to St. Luke’s Hospital for treatment, the Haitian nurses wouldn’t go near her. But Joshua Male did. The 19-year-old sophomore at North Central College in …

In Haiti, it’s one miserable place after another

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Even before the 2010 earthquake, Cite Soleil was a godforsaken place. The densely populated, incredibly impoverished slum section of Port-au-Prince was notorious for crime, disease and misery. The earthquake only made matters worse. Displaced families took up residence there and some 4,000 convicts who escaped …

He’s filling essential needs, one cargo  container at a time

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John Shattuck is the man behind the stuff. The stuff that will cure the sick, educate the young and heal the despondent. From his Frankfort home, he organizes campaigns to send essentials, and some extras, to various locations in Haiti. On behalf of Nuestros Pequenos …

Look hard enough, and you’ll find signs of hope

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Drive through downtown Port-au-Prince and it’s easy to wonder what, if any, improvements have been made in the two years since a powerful earthquake flattened large swaths of the capital city and its surrounding areas in 2010. Piles of crumbled concrete randomly litter the landscape. …

‘Here for the long haul’

Last month, a chartered DC-6 airplane flew 62,000 fish from Fort Pierce, Fla., to Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Their destination? The Zanmi Beni Children’s Home in Port-au-Prince, where relief organization Operation Blessings International has built a new tilapia farm. The aquaculture facility aims to help feed its …

Haiti: Pockets of people fighting for a better world

From sadness, a choir grew.

A child died recently in the St. Germaine program at St. Helene orphanage in Kenscoff, Haiti. Officials at the special needs facility asked a group of local singers to perform at his funeral.

When Gena Heraty, a native of Ireland …

Already alone, earthquake brought Haitian man friendship

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Antoine Jean was watching TV on the afternoon the earth moved. “Everything shook, including me,” he said. It seemed like an eternity, but then, just as suddenly, it stopped. Jean ran to the roof to pray to God. But a few seconds into his prayer, …

‘Sharing people’s misery and sorrow makes them stronger’

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When they were kids, Rick and Steve Frechette served side-by-side as altar boys.

“Rick volunteered to work funerals so he could get out of school early,” Steve Frechette recalled.

And every Sunday after church, his older brother would hold Mass for kids in their Hartford, …

Local ties in Haiti remain strong

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We no sooner went looking for 7-year-old John Rodney Pierre on the grounds of St. Helene orphanage than we found him rounding a corner, walking with friends.

He was sporting a red sweat shirt, blue jeans and light blue Crocs, and once John Shattuck told …

‘Haiti doesn’t need a hand out, it needs a hand up’

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What is to become of Haiti?

Now that the second anniversary of the earthquake has come and gone and much of Port-au-Prince still lies in ruins, will the world shrug, hang up its helping hand and go about its business, leaving Haiti to wallow in …

This is one assignment that will stick with them

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Donna Vickroy, reporter

You don’t pack casually for a trip to the Third World.

Excited, nervous and admittedly a bit wary, I pretty much cleared out the medicine chest and dumped it into my canvas duffel.

I was going to Haiti. A place with a …